Designer repellents: combining olfactory, visual or taste cues with a secondary repellent to deter free-ranging house sparrows from feeding.

@article{Clapperton2012DesignerRC,
  title={Designer repellents: combining olfactory, visual or taste cues with a secondary repellent to deter free-ranging house sparrows from feeding.},
  author={Barbara Kay Clapperton and Richard E.R. Porter and Tim D. Day and J. R. Waas and Lindsay Matthews},
  journal={Pest management science},
  year={2012},
  volume={68 6},
  pages={
          870-7
        }
}
BACKGROUND Repellents may prevent bird pests from eating crops or protect non-target birds from eating harmful substances. The feeding behaviour of free-ranging house sparrows (Passer domesticus) presented with wheat treated with the secondary repellent anthraquinone (AQ), paired with visual and/or olfactory and taste cues, was recorded in a series of trials. The aim was to determine the suitability of repellent combinations for preventing birds from consuming pest baits. RESULTS… 

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