Desert Truffles of the African Kalahari: Ecology, Ethnomycology, and Taxonomy

@article{Trappe2008DesertTO,
  title={Desert Truffles of the African Kalahari: Ecology, Ethnomycology, and Taxonomy},
  author={James M. Trappe and Andrew W. Claridge and David Arora and W. A. Smit},
  journal={Economic Botany},
  year={2008},
  volume={62},
  pages={521-529}
}
Desert Truffles of the African Kalahari: Ecology, Ethnomycology, and Taxonomy. The Khoisan people of the Kalahari Desert have used truffles for centuries. The extreme conditions in which desert truffles grow means that they fruit only sporadically when adequate and properly distributed rainfall occurs, and then only where suitable soil and mycorrhizal hosts occur. Truffles are hunted in the Kalahari by men and women; they look for cracks in the soil, often humped, caused by expansion of the… 

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