Description of the Earliest Fossil Penguin from South America and First Paleogene Vertebrate Locality of Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina

@inproceedings{Clarke2003DescriptionOT,
  title={Description of the Earliest Fossil Penguin from South America and First Paleogene Vertebrate Locality of Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina},
  author={Julia A. Clarke and Eduardo B. Olivero and Pablo F. Puerta},
  year={2003}
}
Abstract We report the discovery of the first vertebrate from the Paleogene of Tierra del Fuego (Isla Grande), Argentina, in southernmost South America. The specimen consists of parts of an associated pelvic girdle and limb that are identified as belonging to the penguin stem clade (Aves: Pansphenisciformes). The specimen, from an exposure of the Leticia Formation (late middle Eocene), is the earliest known penguin (pansphenisciform) from South America. It is more than 20 million years older… 

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