Description of a New Galapagos Giant Tortoise Species (Chelonoidis; Testudines: Testudinidae) from Cerro Fatal on Santa Cruz Island

@article{Poulakakis2015DescriptionOA,
  title={Description of a New Galapagos Giant Tortoise Species (Chelonoidis; Testudines: Testudinidae) from Cerro Fatal on Santa Cruz Island},
  author={Nikos Poulakakis and Danielle L. Edwards and Ylenia Chiari and Ryan C. Garrick and Michael A. Russello and Edgar Benavides and Gregory J. Watkins-Colwell and Scott Glaberman and Washington Tapia and James P. Gibbs and Linda J. Cayot and Adalgisa Caccone},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2015},
  volume={10}
}
The taxonomy of giant Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) is currently based primarily on morphological characters and island of origin. Over the last decade, compelling genetic evidence has accumulated for multiple independent evolutionary lineages, spurring the need for taxonomic revision. On the island of Santa Cruz there is currently a single named species, C. porteri. Recent genetic and morphological studies have shown that, within this taxon, there are two evolutionarily and spatially… 

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