Descent with modification: the unity underlying homology and homoplasy as seen through an analysis of development and evolution

@article{HALL2003DescentWM,
  title={Descent with modification: the unity underlying homology and homoplasy as seen through an analysis of development and evolution},
  author={BRIAN K. HALL},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2003},
  volume={78}
}
  • BRIAN K. HALL
  • Published 2003
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Biological Reviews
Homology is at the foundation of comparative studies in biology at all levels from genes to phenotypes. Homology similarity because of common descent and ancestry, homoplasy is similarity arrived at via independent evolution However, given that there is but one tree of life, all organisms, and therefore all features of organisms, share degree of relationship and similarity one to another. That sharing may be similarity or even identity of structure the sharing of a most recent common ancestor… Expand
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