Descending analgesia – When the spine echoes what the brain expects

@article{Goffaux2007DescendingA,
  title={Descending analgesia – When the spine echoes what the brain expects},
  author={P. Goffaux and W. Redmond and P. Rainville and S. Marchand},
  journal={PAIN},
  year={2007},
  volume={130},
  pages={137-143}
}
Abstract Changes in pain produced by psychological factors (e.g., placebo analgesia) are thought to result from the activity of specific cortical regions. However, subcortical nuclei, including the periaqueductal gray and the rostroventral medulla, also show selective activation when subjects expect pain relief. These brainstem regions send inhibitory projections to the spine and produce diffuse analgesic responses. Regrettably the precise contribution of spinal mechanisms in predicting the… Expand
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