Descartes's Regulae, mathematics, and modern psychology: "the Noblest example of all" in Light of Turing's (1936) On computable Numbers.

@article{Kirkeben2000DescartessRM,
  title={Descartes's Regulae, mathematics, and modern psychology: "the Noblest example of all" in Light of Turing's (1936) On computable Numbers.},
  author={G. Kirkeb{\o}en},
  journal={History of psychology},
  year={2000},
  volume={3 4},
  pages={
          299-325
        }
}
  • G. Kirkebøen
  • Published 2000
  • Philosophy, Medicine
  • History of psychology
There are surprisingly strong connections between the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of mathematics. One particular important example can be seen in the Regulae (1628) of Descartes. In "the noblest example of all," he used his new abstract understanding of numbers to demonstrate how the brain can be considered as a symbol machine and how the intellect's algebraic reasoning can be mirrored as operations on this machine. Even though his attempt failed, it is illuminating to explore it… Expand
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