Descartes’ debt to Teresa of Ávila, or why we should work on women in the history of philosophy

@article{Mercer2017DescartesDT,
  title={Descartes’ debt to Teresa of {\'A}vila, or why we should work on women in the history of philosophy},
  author={Christia Mercer},
  journal={Philosophical Studies},
  year={2017},
  volume={174},
  pages={2539-2555}
}
Despite what you have heard over the years, the famous evil deceiver argument in Meditation One is not original to Descartes (1596–1650). Early modern meditators often struggle with deceptive demons. The author of the Meditations (1641) is merely giving a new spin to a common rhetorical device. Equally surprising is the fact that Descartes’ epistemological rendering of the demon trope is probably inspired by a Spanish nun, Teresa of Ávila (1515–1582), whose works have been ignored by historians… Expand
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