Dermatitis caused by physical irritants

@article{MorrisJones2002DermatitisCB,
  title={Dermatitis caused by physical irritants},
  author={Rachael Morris-Jones and S J Robertson and Janet S. Ross and Ian R. White and J P McFadden and Richard J. G. Rycroft},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2002},
  volume={147}
}
Summary Background Although physical irritant contact dermatitis (PICD) is a common occupational dermatosis, it is one of the least well understood because of its multiple types, lack of diagnostic test, and the many mechanisms involved in its production. 
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  • 2005
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An attempt is made to formulate some kind of working hypothesis concerning the pathophysiology, clinical appearance and treatment of irritant contact dermatitis.
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Two separate instances of dermatoses associated with low humidity in the working environment are reported and alternative explanations are often considered and mistakenly adopted. Expand
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Low-humidity occupational dermatoses are skin conditions caused either entirely or primarily by low relative humidity in the working environment that can cause pruritus, secondary urticaria, and low-grade eczema. Expand
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There were significant associations of existing hand dermatitis with low temperature and low absolute humidity, but not with relative humidity, and these environmental factors must be regarded as possible confounders in the analysis of future epidemiological studies on irritant hand skin changes. Expand
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TLDR
From these studies, it would appear that glass fibers less than 18.0 × 10-5 inches in diameter do not irritate human skin either as fabric or lint but thatGlass fibers of a magnitude greater than 21 × 10 -5 inches will likely cause mechanical irritation of the skin. Expand
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Exposure, skin protection and occupational skin diseases in the glass‐fibre‐reinforced plastics industry
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