Deriving Laws from Ordering Relations

@inproceedings{Knuth2013DerivingLF,
  title={Deriving Laws from Ordering Relations},
  author={K. Knuth},
  year={2013}
}
  • K. Knuth
  • Published 2013
  • Computer Science, Physics, Mathematics
  • The effect of Richard T. Cox’s contribution to probability theory was to generalize Boolean implication among logical statements to degrees of implication, which are manipulated using rules derived from consistency with Boolean algebra. These rules are known as the sum rule, the product rule and Bayes’ Theorem, and the measure resulting from this generalization is probability. In this paper, I will describe how Cox’s technique can be further generalized to include other algebras and hence other… CONTINUE READING
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