Depth-related variability in the photobiology of two populations of Halophila johnsonii and Halophila decipiens

@article{Durako2003DepthrelatedVI,
  title={Depth-related variability in the photobiology of two populations of Halophila johnsonii and Halophila decipiens},
  author={Michael J. Durako and Jennifer I. Kunzelman and W. Judson Kenworthy and Kamille Hammerstrom},
  journal={Marine Biology},
  year={2003},
  volume={142},
  pages={1219-1228}
}
The threatened seagrass Halophila johnsonii Eiseman coexists subtidally with H. decipiens Ostenfeld in southeastern Florida, but only H. johnsonii also occurs intertidally. Pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry and fiber-optic spectrometry were used to investigate the photobiology of two populations of H. johnsonii and H. decipiens in an attempt to explain these distribution patterns. Maximum photosynthetic quantum yields (Fv/Fm) were measured in situ as a function of depth distribution within… Expand
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