Depression in the workplace: An economic cost analysis of depression-related productivity loss attributable to job strain and bullying

@article{McTernan2013DepressionIT,
  title={Depression in the workplace: An economic cost analysis of depression-related productivity loss attributable to job strain and bullying},
  author={Wesley P. McTernan and Maureen F Dollard and Anthony Daniel LaMontagne},
  journal={Work \& Stress},
  year={2013},
  volume={27},
  pages={321 - 338}
}
Depression represents an increasing global health epidemic with profound effects in the workplace. Building a business case via the quantification of potentially avertable costs is essential to convince organizations to address depression at work. Our study objectives were to: (1) demonstrate a process path whereby job strain and bullying are related to productivity loss via their effects on depression; (2) estimate the costs to employers of sickness absence and presenteeism that are associated… Expand
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