Depression in primary care: part 1—screening and diagnosis

@article{Ferenchick2019DepressionIP,
  title={Depression in primary care: part 1—screening and diagnosis},
  author={Erin K. Ferenchick and Parashar Pravin Ramanuj and Harold Alan Pincus},
  journal={BMJ},
  year={2019},
  volume={365}
}
Abstract Depression is a common and heterogeneous condition with a chronic and recurrent natural course that is frequently seen in the primary care setting. Primary care providers play a central role in managing depression and concurrent physical comorbidities, and they face challenges in diagnosing and treating the condition. In this two part series, we review the evidence available to help to guide primary care providers and practices to recognize and manage depression. In this first of two… 
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The evidence available to help to guide primary care providers and practices to recognize and manage depression is reviewed, detailing the recommended lifestyle, drug, and psychological interventions at the individual level.
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Depression in primary care: part 2—management
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The evidence available to help to guide primary care providers and practices to recognize and manage depression is reviewed, detailing the recommended lifestyle, drug, and psychological interventions at the individual level.
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