Depression and myocardial infarction: relationship between heart and mind

@article{Strik2001DepressionAM,
  title={Depression and myocardial infarction: relationship between heart and mind},
  author={Jacqueline J M H Strik and Adriaan Honig and Michael Maes},
  journal={Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2001},
  volume={25},
  pages={879-892}
}
  • J. Strik, A. Honig, M. Maes
  • Published 2001
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
There is a relationship between depression and Myocardial Infarction (MI) as higher levels of depression and severe depression (major vs minor) are associated with higher morbidity and mortality due to cardiac events, which are mainly caused by arrhythmia. Second, severity of MI is not or even inversely related to development of depression. Depression post-MI goes often unrecognized as only 10% of depressed MI patients are diagnosed as such. This underestimation of depression is attributed to… Expand
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