Depictions of Mental Illness in Print Media: A Prospective National Sample

@article{Coverdale2002DepictionsOM,
  title={Depictions of Mental Illness in Print Media: A Prospective National Sample},
  author={J. Coverdale and R. Nairn and D. Claasen},
  journal={Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2002},
  volume={36},
  pages={697 - 700}
}
Objective: Because there are no published reports of depictions of mental illness in print media based on national samples, we set out to prospectively collect and analyse a near complete New Zealand sample of print media. Methods: A commercial clipping bureau was contracted to provide cuttings of all items with any mental health or illness aspect over a four week period. These items were analysed for potentially positive and negative depictions and how mental illness was represented within… Expand
The Portrayal of Mental Health and Illness in Australian Non-Fiction Media
TLDR
Media reporting of mental health/illness in Australian non-fiction media was extensive, generally of good quality and focused less on themes of crime and violence than may have been expected. Expand
People Never See Us Living Well: An Appraisal of the Personal Stories About Mental Illness in a Prospective Print Media Sample
Objective: Having found no discussions of self-depictions offered by psychiatric patients in the mass media we sought such items in a prospective national sample of print media and analysed how thoseExpand
The portrayal of suicide and mental illness: A province wide survey from Nova Scotia
TLDR
The study showed that the present methodology can be used to monitor any subsequent effect on the portrayal of mental illness and suicide in the media and are guiding the development of media guidelines in Nova Scotia. Expand
More Us Than Them: Positive Depictions of Mental Illness on Australian Television News
TLDR
Reviewing television news coverage of mental illness including self-depictions from people with mental illness, and views expressed by mental health experts and politicians in all 538 news and current affairs items related to mental illness broadcast on free-to-air Sydney television, May 2005-October 2007 provides support for the importance of involving those with histories ofmental illness in news coverage. Expand
Good News? A Longitudinal Analysis of Newspaper Portrayals of Mental Illness in Canada 2005 to 2015
  • R. Whitley, Jiawei Wang
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie
  • 2017
TLDR
The study indicates that news media coverage related to mental illness has improved over the past decade, and may be related to the concerted efforts of the MHCC, which has executed a targeted strategy aimed at reducing stigma and improving media coverage since 2007. Expand
Surveying the portrayal of mental illness across a jurisdiction: is more than one method appropriate?
  • S. Kisely
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Public health
  • 2008
TLDR
Two recent studies of non-fiction media found that the vast majority of items were of good quality, with the only failing being the absence of information on appropriate services. Expand
Trends in Newspaper Coverage of Mental Illness in Canada: 2005–2010
  • R. Whitley, Sarah Berry
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie
  • 2013
TLDR
A retrospective analysis of Canadian newspaper coverage from 2005 to 2010 found that there is scope for more balanced, accurate, and informative coverage of mental health issues in Canada. Expand
Representation of Mental Illness in Leading Ugandan Daily Newspapers: A Content Analysis
TLDR
This study investigated the coverage of mental illness in the two largest circulation newspapers in Uganda: The Monitor and The New Vision, and found just 53 articles addressing mental illness. Expand
Room for Improvement: Mixed Portrayal of Young People with Mental Illness on Australian Television News
TLDR
Overall the portrayal of young people with mental illnesses on television news is not as positive as that for adults, however, first-person depictions resulted in a more positive representation of youngPeople. Expand
A Framework for Understanding Media Depictions of Mental Illness
  • R. Nairn, S. Coverdale, J. Coverdale
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Academic psychiatry : the journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry
  • 2011
TLDR
Four particularly important cultural mechanisms contribute to the persistence of these negative depictions of persons with mental illness: language in use, culture, social practices, and institutions. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 23 REFERENCES
Portrayal of Mental Illness in Canadian Newspapers *
  • D. M. Day, S. Page
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie
  • 1986
TLDR
Content analysis of 103 newspaper reports taken from eight major Canadian newspapers indicated that the newspapers portrayed mental illness and the mentally ill in a manner which could be described as essentially pejorative, thus seeming to support frequent observations and complaints from the mental health establishment about inadequate or unfair coverage of mental illness in the popular print media. Expand
Does the Use of Psychiatrists as Sources of Information Improve Media Depictions of Mental Illness? A Pilot Study
  • R. Nairn
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry
  • 1999
TLDR
If psychiatrists and other mental health professionals are to have a positive effect on how media depict mental illness, they will have to develop closer relationships with journalists and a better appreciation of media priorities and practices. Expand
From Source Material to News Story in New Zealand Print Media: A Prospective Study of the Stigmatizing Processes in Depicting Mental Illness
TLDR
A potentially positive discourse (human rights) was not by itself sufficient to ensure a positive portrayal of mental illness, and an understanding of the transformations is important for efforts to effectively combat the stigmatization of those with mental illness. Expand
Media Depictions of Mental Illness: An Analysis of the Use of Dangerousness
  • R. Allen, R. Nairn
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry
  • 1997
TLDR
It is concluded that media practices directed at engaging readers require the use of cases and a style of writing that forces readers to draw upon commonsense knowledge of mental illness to understand the text. Expand
How mental illness is portrayed in children's television
TLDR
Disclosure analysis of portrayals of mental illness through repeated viewings identified patterns in the use of linguistic, semiotic and rhetorical resources that suggest young viewers are being socialised into stigmatising conceptions ofmental illness. Expand
Constructing Mental Illness as Dangerous: A Pilot Study
TLDR
The findings suggest that mental health professionals working to reduce the stigma of mental illness need to have a reasonably sophisticated understanding of the practices and priorities of television production if they are to collaborate effectively with producers to create dramas that convey more human and sympathetic understandings ofmental illness. Expand
A legal opinion's consequences for the stigmatisation of the mentally ill: Case analysis
A nearly complete national sample of newsprint including news stories and opinion pieces was collected over one month in New Zealand. This featured the extensively covered release of a legal opinionExpand
Mass media images of mental illness: A review of the literature
Studies that address the frequency, accuracy, and impact of mass media portrayals of mental illness are reviewed. Numerous studies of frequency and content of media depictions support clinicalExpand
The impact of the mass media on public images of mental illness: media content and audience belief
TLDR
The findings indicate the importance of working with the media to destigmatise mental health problems and suggest some respondents with personal knowledge of mental illness rejected the dominant media message, others accepted it against the evidence of their own eyes. Expand
Reporting mental health: a discourse analysis of mental health-related news in two Australian newspapers.
  • M. Hazelton
  • Medicine
  • The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing
  • 1997
TLDR
An analysis of mental health-related news items in two Australian newspapers-one with a national readership, the other being more regionally orientated-over 1 year finds messages about mental health and illness, mental health policy, psychiatry,mental health nursing and other mental health -related topics are constructed and conveyed in the print media. Expand
...
1
2
3
...