Deoxyribozyme-mediated knockdown of xylosyltransferase-1 mRNA promotes axon growth in the adult rat spinal cord.

@article{Hurtado2008DeoxyribozymemediatedKO,
  title={Deoxyribozyme-mediated knockdown of xylosyltransferase-1 mRNA promotes axon growth in the adult rat spinal cord.},
  author={Andr{\'e}s Hurtado and Heidrun Podinin and Martin Oudega and Barbara Grimpe},
  journal={Brain : a journal of neurology},
  year={2008},
  volume={131 Pt 10},
  pages={
          2596-605
        }
}
In the injured spinal cord, proteoglycans (PGs) within scar tissue obstruct axon growth through their glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-side chains. The formation of GAG-side chains (glycosylation) is catalysed by xylosyltransferase-1 (XT-1). Here, we knocked down XT-1 mRNA using a tailored deoxyribozyme (DNAXTas) and hypothesized that this would decrease the amount of glycosylated PGs and, consequently, promote axon growth in the adult rat spinal cord. A continuous 2-week delivery of DNAXTas near the… Expand
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