Denture cream

@article{Nations2008DentureC,
  title={Denture cream},
  author={Sharon P. Nations and Philip J. Boyer and Lori A. Love and Mary F. Burritt and J A Butz and Gil I. Wolfe and Linda S. Hynan and Joan S. Reisch and Jaya R. Trivedi},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={2008},
  volume={71},
  pages={639 - 643}
}
Background: Chronic, excess zinc intake can result in copper deficiency and profound neurologic disease. However, when hyperzincemia is identified, the source often remains elusive. We identified four patients, one previously reported, with various neurologic abnormalities in the setting of hypocupremia and hyperzincemia. Each of these patients wore dentures and used very large amounts of denture cream chronically. Objective: To determine zinc concentration in the denture creams used by the… 

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