Dental caries in human evolution: frequency of carious lesions in South African fossil hominins

@article{Towle2019DentalCI,
  title={Dental caries in human evolution: frequency of carious lesions in South African fossil hominins},
  author={Ian Towle and Joel D. Irish and Isabelle De Groote and Christianne Fern{\'e}e},
  journal={bioRxiv},
  year={2019}
}
Caries frequencies in South African fossil hominins were observed and compared with other hominin samples. Species studied include Paranthropus robustus, Homo naledi, Australopithecus africanus, early Homo and A. sediba. Teeth were viewed macroscopically with Micro-CT scans used to confirm lesions. Position and severity of each lesion were also noted and described. For all South African fossil hominin specimens studied, 16 have carious lesions, six of which are described for the first time in… 
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