Dental Morphology and the Phylogenetic “Place” of Australopithecus sediba

@article{Irish2013DentalMA,
  title={Dental Morphology and the Phylogenetic “Place” of Australopithecus sediba},
  author={Joel D. Irish and Debbie Guatelli‐Steinberg and Scott S. Legge and Darryl J. de Ruiter and Lee R. Berger},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={340}
}
To characterize further the Australopithecus sediba hypodigm, we describe 22 dental traits in specimens MH1 and MH2. Like other skeletal elements, the teeth present a mosaic of primitive and derived features. The new nonmetric data are then qualitatively and phenetically compared with those in eight other African hominin samples, before cladistic analyses using a gorilla outgroup. There is some distinction, largely driven by contrasting molar traits, from East African australopiths. However, Au… 
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New fossils of Australopithecus sediba reveal a nearly complete lower back.
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