Demythologizing Arctodus simus, the ‘Short-Faced’ Long-Legged and Predaceous Bear that Never Was

@inproceedings{Figueirido2010DemythologizingAS,
  title={Demythologizing Arctodus simus, the ‘Short-Faced’ Long-Legged and Predaceous Bear that Never Was},
  author={Borja Figueirido and Juan Antonio P{\'e}rez-Claros and Vanessa Torregrosa and Alberto Mart{\'i}n‐Serra and Paul Palmqvist},
  year={2010}
}
ABSTRACT In this study, we review the previous evidence on the paleobiology of the giant, ‘short-faced’ bear Arctodus simus (Mammalia: Carnivora: Ursidae) and contribute new ecomorphological inferences on the paleobiology of this enigmatic species. Craniodental variables are used in a comparative morphometric study across the families Felidae, Hyaenidae, Canidae, and Ursidae. Principal components analyses (PCAs) do not show an ecomorphological adaptation towards bonecracking or hypercarnivory… Expand

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