Demography of Verreaux’s sifaka in a stochastic rainfall environment

@article{Lawler2009DemographyOV,
  title={Demography of Verreaux’s sifaka in a stochastic rainfall environment},
  author={Richard R. Lawler and Hal Caswell and Alison F. Richard and Joelisoa Ratsirarson and Robert Earl Dewar and Marion Schwartz},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2009},
  volume={161},
  pages={491-504}
}
In this study, we use deterministic and stochastic models to analyze the demography of Verreaux’s sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi verreauxi) in a fluctuating rainfall environment. The model is based on 16 years of data from Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, southwest Madagascar. The parameters in the stage-classified life cycle were estimated using mark-recapture methods. Statistical models were evaluated using information-theoretic techniques and multi-model inference. The highest ranking model is… 

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