Demographics of hip dysplasia in the Maine Coon cat

@article{Loder2018DemographicsOH,
  title={Demographics of hip dysplasia in the Maine Coon cat},
  author={Randall T. Loder and Rory J. Todhunter},
  journal={Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery},
  year={2018},
  volume={20},
  pages={302 - 307}
}
Objectives The aim of this study was to report the demographics of feline hip dysplasia (FHD) in the Maine Coon cat. [] Key Method There were 2732 unique cats; 2708 (99.1%) were Maine Coons, and only these were studied. Variables analyzed were sex, month/season of birth and hip dysplasia score. Two groups were created: those with and without FHD. P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The youngest cat with FHD was 4 months of age.

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