Demographic Threats to the Sustainability of Brazil Nut Exploitation

@article{Peres2003DemographicTT,
  title={Demographic Threats to the Sustainability of Brazil Nut Exploitation},
  author={Carlos Augusto Peres and Cl{\'a}udia Baider and Pieter A. Zuidema and Lucia Helena de Oliveira Wadt and Karen A. Kainer and D. A. P. Gomes-Silva and Rafael P. Salom{\~a}o and Luciana Sim{\~o}es and Eduardo R N Franciosi and Fernando Cornejo Valverde and Rogerio Gribel and Glenn H. Shepard and Milton Kanashiro and Peter Coventry and Douglas W. Yu and Andrew R. Watkinson and Robert P. Freckleton},
  journal={Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={302},
  pages={2112 - 2114}
}
A comparative analysis of 23 populations of the Brazil nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa) across the Brazilian, Peruvian, and Bolivian Amazon shows that the history and intensity of Brazil nut exploitation are major determinants of population size structure. Populations subjected to persistent levels of harvest lack juvenile trees less than 60 centimeters in diameter at breast height; only populations with a history of either light or recent exploitation contain large numbers of juvenile trees. A… 
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