Demographic Evidence That Human Ovulation Is Undetectable (At Least in Pair Bonds)1

@article{Brewis2005DemographicET,
  title={Demographic Evidence That Human Ovulation Is Undetectable (At Least in Pair Bonds)1},
  author={Alexandra A. Brewis and Mary C. Meyer},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2005},
  volume={46},
  pages={465 - 471}
}
Human sexual behavior has classically been portrayed as distinct among the primates. Hallmark features include continuous female receptivity and an undetectable (“concealed,” “sequestered,” “cryptic,” or “unsignaled”) ovulation, with sexual behavior neither peaking nor even intensifying with its occurrence (Small 1996; see, e.g., Alexander and Noonan 1979, Campbell 1985, Fedigan 1986, Fisher 1982, Geary and Flinn 2001, Lovejoy 1981, Pilbeam 1980, Strassman 1981). The origins and implications of… Expand
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