Delusional misidentifications and duplications

@article{Devinsky2009DelusionalMA,
  title={Delusional misidentifications and duplications},
  author={Orrin Devinsky},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={2009},
  volume={72},
  pages={80 - 87}
}
  • O. Devinsky
  • Published 6 January 2009
  • Psychology, Biology, Medicine
  • Neurology
When the delusional misidentification syndromes reduplicative paramnesia and Capgras syndromes result from neurologic disease, lesions are usually bifrontal and/or right hemispheric. The related disorders of confabulation and anosognosis share overlapping mechanisms and anatomic pathology. A dual mechanism is postulated for the delusional misidentification syndromes: negative effects from right hemisphere and frontal lobe dysfunction as well as positive effects from release (i.e., overactivity… 

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