Delirium and Confusion in the 19th Century: A Conceptual History

@article{Berros1981DeliriumAC,
  title={Delirium and Confusion in the 19th Century: A Conceptual History},
  author={Germ{\'a}n E. Berr{\'i}os},
  journal={British Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={1981},
  volume={139},
  pages={439 - 449}
}
  • G. Berríos
  • Published 1 November 1981
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • British Journal of Psychiatry
Summary Delirium remained a stable psychiatric category until the early 19th century when it underwent aetiological and phenomenological redefinition, precipitating the transformation of the functional insanities into psychoses. Confusion, introduced by French workers during the second half of the century, referred to a syndrome wider than (but including) delirium. It emphasized chaotic thinking and cognitive failure. The notion of clouding of consciousness (and temporo-spatial disorientation… 
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