Delineating self-referential processing from episodic memory retrieval: Common and dissociable networks

@article{Sajonz2010DelineatingSP,
  title={Delineating self-referential processing from episodic memory retrieval: Common and dissociable networks},
  author={Bastian Elmar Alexander Sajonz and Thorsten Kahnt and Daniel S. Margulies and Soyoung Q. Park and Andr{\'e} Wittmann and Meline Stoy and Andreas Str{\"o}hle and Andreas Heinz and Georg Northoff and Felix Bermpohl},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2010},
  volume={50},
  pages={1606-1617}
}

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