Deletions in processed pseudogenes accumulate faster in rodents than in humans

@article{Graur2005DeletionsIP,
  title={Deletions in processed pseudogenes accumulate faster in rodents than in humans},
  author={Dan Graur and Yuval Shuali and Wen-Hsiung Li},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2005},
  volume={28},
  pages={279-285}
}
SummaryThe relative rates of point nucleotide substitution and accumulation of gap events (deletions and insertions) were calculated for 22 human and 30 rodent processed pseudogenes. Deletion events not only outnumbered insertions (the ratio being 7∶1 and 3∶1 for human and rodent pseudogenes, respectively), but also the total length of deletions was greater than that of insertions. Compared with their functional homologs, human processed pseudogenes were found to be shorter by about 1.2%, and… 
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