Deleterious Mutations and Selection for Sex in Finite Diploid Populations

@article{Roze2010DeleteriousMA,
  title={Deleterious Mutations and Selection for Sex in Finite Diploid Populations},
  author={Denis Roze and Richard E. Michod},
  journal={Genetics},
  year={2010},
  volume={184},
  pages={1095 - 1112}
}
In diploid populations, indirect benefits of sex may stem from segregation and recombination. Although it has been recognized that finite population size is an important component of selection for recombination, its effects on selection for segregation have been somewhat less studied. In this article, we develop analytical two- and three-locus models to study the effect of recurrent deleterious mutations on a modifier gene increasing sex, in a finite diploid population. The model also… 
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