Delayed recognition of geomorphology papers in the Geological Society of America Bulletin

@article{Goldstein2017DelayedRO,
  title={Delayed recognition of geomorphology papers in the Geological Society of America Bulletin},
  author={Evan B. Goldstein},
  journal={Progress in Physical Geography},
  year={2017},
  volume={41},
  pages={363 - 368}
}
  • E. Goldstein
  • Published 2017
  • History
  • Progress in Physical Geography
The Geological Society of America Bulletin was an early home for quantitative geomorphology research. Although geomorphology papers are not uniformly the highest cited papers in the Bulletin, many show ‘delayed recognition’—they garner only few citations directly after publication, before suddenly being widely and numerously cited (sometimes decades after publication). I focus here on (1) algorithmically detecting cases of delayed recognition in geomorphology literature from the Bulletin and (2… Expand

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