Delayed inhibition of VEGF signaling after stroke attenuates blood-brain barrier breakdown and improves functional recovery in a comorbidity-dependent manner.

@article{Reeson2015DelayedIO,
  title={Delayed inhibition of VEGF signaling after stroke attenuates blood-brain barrier breakdown and improves functional recovery in a comorbidity-dependent manner.},
  author={Patrick Reeson and Kelly A. Tennant and Kim Gerrow and Josh J Wang and Sammy Weiser Novak and Kelsey N Thompson and Krista-Linn Lockhart and Andrew P Holmes and Patrick C. Nahirney and Craig E Brown},
  journal={The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience},
  year={2015},
  volume={35 13},
  pages={5128-43}
}
Diabetes is a common comorbidity in stroke patients and a strong predictor of poor functional outcome. To provide a more mechanistic understanding of this clinically relevant problem, we focused on how diabetes affects blood-brain barrier (BBB) function after stroke. Because the BBB can be compromised for days after stroke and thus further exacerbate… CONTINUE READING
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