Delayed biological recovery from extinctions throughout the fossil record

@article{Kirchner2000DelayedBR,
  title={Delayed biological recovery from extinctions throughout the fossil record},
  author={James W. Kirchner and Anne Weil},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2000},
  volume={404},
  pages={177-180}
}
How quickly does biodiversity rebound after extinctions? Palaeobiologists have examined the temporal, taxonomic and geographic patterns of recovery following individual mass extinctions in detail, but have not analysed recoveries from extinctions throughout the fossil record as a whole. Here, we measure how fast biodiversity rebounds after extinctions in general, rather than after individual mass extinctions, by calculating the cross-correlation between extinction and origination rates across… 
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  • 2001
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  • Environmental Science, Geography
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