Delay Games with WMSO+U Winning Conditions

@article{Zimmermann2016DelayGW,
  title={Delay Games with WMSO+U Winning Conditions},
  author={Martin Zimmermann},
  journal={RAIRO Theor. Informatics Appl.},
  year={2016},
  volume={50},
  pages={145-165}
}
Delay games are two-player games of infinite duration in which one player may delay her moves to obtain a lookahead on her opponent’s moves. We consider delay games with winning conditions expressed in weak monadic second order logic with the unbounding quantifier, which is able to express (un)boundedness properties. 

Unbounded Lookahead in WMSO+U Games

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Prompt Delay

Delay games are two-player games of infinite duration in which one player may delay her moves to obtain a lookahead on her opponent’s moves. Recently, such games with quantitative winning conditions

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What are Strategies in Delay Games? Borel Determinacy for Games with Lookahead

Determinacy of delay games with Borel winning conditions, infinite-duration two-player games in which one player may delay her moves to obtain a lookahead on her opponent's moves, is proved and different notions of universal strategies for both players are introduced.

Games with costs and delays

  • Martin Zimmermann
  • Economics
    2017 32nd Annual ACM/IEEE Symposium on Logic in Computer Science (LICS)
  • 2017
The benefit of introducing lookahead is twofold: not only does it allow the delaying player to win games she would lose without, but lookahead also allows her to improve the quality of her winning strategies in games she wins even without lookahead.

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Security-Aware Synthesis Using Delayed-Action Games

A delayed-action games (DAGs) formalism that simulates hidden-information games (HIGs) as SMGs, where hidden information is captured by delaying a player's actions, and proposes a DAG-based framework for strategy synthesis and analysis.

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Delay games are two-player games of infinite duration in which one player may delay her moves to obtain a lookahead on her opponent’s moves. For ω-regular winning conditions it is known that such

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Delay games are two-player games of infinite duration in which one player may delay her moves to obtain a lookahead on her opponent’s moves. Recently, such games with quantitative winning conditions

How Much Lookahead is Needed to Win Infinite Games?

Solving delay games with reachability conditions is shown to be PSPACE-complete by giving an exponential time algorithm and an exponential upper bound on the necessary lookahead and showing EXPTIME-hardness of the solution problem and tight exponential lower bounds on the lookahead.

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