Degenerate hearing and sound localization in naked mole rats (Heterocephalus glaber), with an overview of central auditory structures

@article{Heffner1993DegenerateHA,
  title={Degenerate hearing and sound localization in naked mole rats (Heterocephalus glaber), with an overview of central auditory structures},
  author={Rickye S. Heffner and Henry E Heffner},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Neurology},
  year={1993},
  volume={331}
}
Behavioral tests of absolute sensitivity and sound localization in African naked mole rats show that, despite their communal social structure and large vocal repertoire, their hearing has degenerated much like that of other subterranean species. First, their ability to detect sound is limited, with their maximum sensitivity being only 35 dB (occurring at 4 kHz). Second, their high‐frequency hearing is severely limited, with their hearing range (at 60 dB sound pressure level [SPL]) extending… Expand
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Proceedings of the Institute of Acoustics 3 MIDDLE EAR MORPHOLOGY 3 . 1 Middle ear morphology in talpid moles
It has been popularly assumed, at least since the time of Pliny the Elder [1], that the hearing of moles and other subterranean mammals is acute, perhaps to compensate for their poor vision. InExpand
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