Definition and description of schizophrenia in the DSM-5

@article{Tandon2013DefinitionAD,
  title={Definition and description of schizophrenia in the DSM-5},
  author={Rajiv Tandon and Wolfgang Gaebel and Deanna M. Barch and Juan R. Bustillo and Raquel E. Gur and Stephan Heckers and Dolores Malaspina and Michael J. Owen and Susan K. Schultz and Ming T. Tsuang and Jim van Os and William T Carpenter},
  journal={Schizophrenia Research},
  year={2013},
  volume={150},
  pages={3-10}
}
Although dementia praecox or schizophrenia has been considered a unique disease for over a century, its definitions and boundaries have changed over this period and its etiology and pathophysiology remain elusive. Despite changing definitions, DSM-IV schizophrenia is reliably diagnosed, has fair validity and conveys useful clinical information. Therefore, the essence of the broad DSM-IV definition of schizophrenia is retained in DSM-5. The clinical manifestations are extremely diverse, however… Expand

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