Defining the place of burial: What makes a cemetery a cemetery?

@article{Rugg2000DefiningTP,
  title={Defining the place of burial: What makes a cemetery a cemetery?},
  author={Julie Rugg},
  journal={Mortality},
  year={2000},
  volume={5},
  pages={259 - 275}
}
  • J. Rugg
  • Published 1 November 2000
  • Sociology
  • Mortality
A great deal of material has been written about cemeteries based on the assumption that they constitute a specific type of burial place, but few writers have given close attention to the task of describing the features that may be particular to cemeteries. This paper regards cemeteries as specifically demarcated sites of burial, with an ordered internal layout that is conducive both to families claiming control over their grave spaces, and to the conducting of what might be deemed by the… Expand
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