Defining and assessing animal pain

@article{Sneddon2014DefiningAA,
  title={Defining and assessing animal pain},
  author={Lynne U. Sneddon and Robert William Elwood and Shelley A. Adamo and Matthew C. Leach},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2014},
  volume={97},
  pages={201-212}
}
The detection and assessment of pain in animals is crucial to improving their welfare in a variety of contexts in which humans are ethically or legally bound to do so. Thus clear standards to judge whether pain is likely to occur in any animal species is vital to inform whether to alleviate pain or to drive the refinement of procedures to reduce invasiveness, thereby minimizing pain. We define two key concepts that can be used to evaluate the potential for pain in both invertebrate and… Expand

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