Deficits in comprehending wh-questions in children with hearing loss – the contribution of phonological short-term memory and syntactic complexity

@article{Penke2018DeficitsIC,
  title={Deficits in comprehending wh-questions in children with hearing loss – the contribution of phonological short-term memory and syntactic complexity},
  author={Martina Penke and Eva Wimmer},
  journal={Clinical Linguistics \& Phonetics},
  year={2018},
  volume={32},
  pages={267 - 284}
}
ABSTRACT The aim of the study is to investigate if German children with hearing loss (HL) display persisting problems in comprehending complex sentences and to find out whether these problems can be linked to limitations in phonological short-term memory (PSTM). A who-question comprehension test (picture pointing) and a nonword repetition (NWR) task were conducted with 21 German children with bilateral sensorineural HL (ages 3–4) and with age-matched 19 normal hearing (NH) children. Follow-up… 
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