Deficit models and divergent philosophies: Service providers’ perspectives on barriers and incentives to drug treatment

@article{Treloar2006DeficitMA,
  title={Deficit models and divergent philosophies: Service providers’ perspectives on barriers and incentives to drug treatment},
  author={Carla Treloar and Martin Holt},
  journal={Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy},
  year={2006},
  volume={13},
  pages={367 - 382}
}
  • C. Treloar, M. Holt
  • Published 1 January 2006
  • Medicine
  • Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy
Aims: To ascertain service providers’ views on barriers and incentives to illicit drug users accessing or remaining in treatment. Methods: Interviews with service providers in Australia were conducted. Results: Two main themes were explored. Service providers suggested that the perception of a person seeking treatment was strongly associated with the image of that person as deficient, defective or lacking, and that this could impede treatment. Service providers also suggested that differing… Expand
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