Defensive tool use in a coconut-carrying octopus

@article{Finn2009DefensiveTU,
  title={Defensive tool use in a coconut-carrying octopus},
  author={Julian Finn and Tom Tregenza and Marc D. Norman},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={19},
  pages={R1069-R1070}
}

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