Defensive tool use in a coconut-carrying octopus

@article{Finn2009DefensiveTU,
  title={Defensive tool use in a coconut-carrying octopus},
  author={Julian K. Finn and Tom Tregenza and Marc D. Norman},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={19},
  pages={R1069-R1070}
}
Summary The use of tools has become a benchmark for cognitive sophistication. Originally regarded as a defining feature of our species, tool-use behaviours have subsequently been revealed in other primates and a growing spectrum of mammals and birds [1]. Among invertebrates, however, the acquisition of items that are deployed later has not previously been reported. We repeatedly observed soft-sediment dwelling octopuses carrying around coconut shell halves, assembling them as a shelter only… Expand
Tool-use in the brown bear (Ursus arctos)
  • V. Deecke
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Animal Cognition
  • 2012
TLDR
This is the first report of tool-using behaviour in a wild brown bear (Ursus arctos) and it clearly shows that these animals possess the advanced motor learning necessary for tool-use. Expand
Observational and Other Types of Learning in Octopus
TLDR
This chapter provides an update on the experimental evidence for observational learning in the octopus and discusses the constraints and peculiarities of social learning and the potential evolutionary meanings of this capability in this cephalopod mollusk. Expand
Tool Use in Fishes
TLDR
It is revealed that tool use seems to be confined to a limited number of fish taxa, particularly the wrasse, which may show similarities with the greater than expected number of examples of tool use in primates and corvids amongst mammals and birds, respectively. Expand
Repository 3-2012 Tool Use in Fishes
Tool use was once considered the sole domain of humans. Over the last 40 years, however, it has become apparent that tool use may be widespread across the animal kingdom. Pioneering studies inExpand
Safekeeping of tools in Goffin's cockatoos, Cacatua goffiniana
TLDR
It is demonstrated that, in a set-up allowing for tool losses, the birds quickly started to keep their tools safe in between tool-using events, suggesting that the behaviour was a product of innovation rather than inherited predispositions. Expand
An Embodied View of Octopus Neurobiology
TLDR
Consideration of the unusual neurobiology of the octopus in the light of its unique morphology suggests that similar embodied principles are instrumental for understanding the emergence of intelligent behavior in all biological systems. Expand
Cognition and Recognition in the Cephalopod Mollusc Octopus vulgaris: Coordinating Interaction with Environment and Conspecifics
TLDR
The examination of data and observations available provide the basis for asking new stimulating questions about the cognitive abilities of octopuses and their allies and open novel scenarios for future comparative research. Expand
Stone tool transport by wild Burmese long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea)
TLDR
This is the first study of directly observed stone tool transport in wild and unhabituated Burmese long-tailed macaques in Thailand, and it is found that tools used to open sessile oysters typically were used to consume more prey per episode than those employed on motile prey, and females transported tools further than males. Expand
Care and Enrichment for Captive Cephalopods
Cephalopods have become an archetype for invertebrate cognition, sentience and welfare studies. Their convergence with so-called ‘higher’ vertebrates (birds, mammals) in memory, learning,Expand
Cephalopod cognition
TLDR
The soft-bodied cephalopods, namely octopus, cuttlefish, and squid, are widely considered to be the most cognitively advanced group of invertebrates and are also capable of intriguing feats of behaviour that appear to indicate complex cognition. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 26 REFERENCES
‘Home’ choice and modification by juvenile Octopus vulgaris (Mollusca: Cephalopoda): specialized intelligence and tool use?
Analysis of ‘homes’ occupied by juvenile Octopus vulgaris shows flexible behaviour which may indicate specialized intelligence and tool use. Octopuses occupied sheltered areas for a short time,Expand
Underwater Bipedal Locomotion by Octopuses in Disguise
TLDR
Two species of octopus walk on two alternating arms using a rolling gait and appear to use the remaining six arms for camouflage, using underwater video to analyze the kinematics of their strides. Expand
Dynamic mimicry in an Indo–Malayan octopus
TLDR
It is revealed that the ‘mimic octopus’ emerges during daylight hours to forage on sand substrates in full view of pelagic fish predators, allowing it to enhance further the benefits of mimicking toxic models by employing mimicry according to the nature of perceived threats. Expand
Setting tool use within the context of animal construction behaviour.
TLDR
It is suggested that tools are actually seldom very useful compared with anatomical adaptations and that focussing on animal tool use primarily in terms of human evolution can lead to important insights regarding the ecological and cognitive abilities of non-human tool users being overlooked. Expand
Sponge Carrying by Dolphins (Delphinidae, Tursiops sp.): A Foraging Specialization Involving Tool Use?
TLDR
During long-term research on bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, K'estern Australia, sevcral individuals were observed carrying sponges, lici,inodic!pum mesemterinum, on their rostra, revealing a stereotyped surfacing and diving pattern, and occasional indications of prey consumption. Expand
Female impersonation as an alternative reproductive strategy in giant cuttlefish
TLDR
The observations of giant cuttlefish (Sepia apama) suggest this ability has allowed them to evolve alternative mating strategies in which males can switch between the appearance of a female and that of a male in order to foil the guarding attempts of larger males. Expand
Dynamic mimicry in an IndoMalayan octopus
Mark D. Norman1,2*, Julian Finn3 and Tom Tregenza4 1Museum Victoria, G.P.O. Box 666E, Melbourne,Victoria 3001, Australia 2Department of Zoology, University of Melbourne,Victoria 3010, AustraliaExpand
Apes Save Tools for Future Use
TLDR
Bonobos and orangutans selected, transported, and saved appropriate tools above baseline levels to use them 1 hour later, and it was shown that seeing the apparatus during tool selection was not necessary to succeed. Expand
Zoology
municate?). They are grouped into seven chapters each containing seven to 14 questions. The volume begins with the chapter Bat Basics and ends with the chapter Bats and People. It also includes eightExpand
Cognitive cladistics and cultural override in Hominid spatial cognition
TLDR
It is reasonable to conclude, it is argued, that language and culture mask the native tendencies in the authors' species, and the correct perspective on human cognition is neither nativist uniformitarian nor “blank slate” but recognizes the powerful impact thatlanguage and culture can have on their shared primate cognitive biases. Expand
...
1
2
3
...