Deep winds beneath Saturn’s upper clouds from a seasonal long-lived planetary-scale storm

@article{SnchezLavega2011DeepWB,
  title={Deep winds beneath Saturn’s upper clouds from a seasonal long-lived planetary-scale storm},
  author={Agust{\'i}n S{\'a}nchez-Lavega and Teresa del R{\'i}o-Gaztelurrutia and Ricardo Hueso and Josep M. Gomez-Forrellad and J. F. Sanz‐Requena and Jon Haitz Legarreta and E. Garc{\'i}a‐Melendo and F. Colas and J. J. Lecacheux and Leigh N. Fletcher and David Barrado-Navascu{\'e}s and Douglas Parker},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={475},
  pages={71-74}
}
Convective storms occur regularly in Saturn’s atmosphere. Huge storms known as Great White Spots, which are ten times larger than the regular storms, are rarer and occur about once per Saturnian year (29.5 Earth years). Current models propose that the outbreak of a Great White Spot is due to moist convection induced by water. However, the generation of the global disturbance and its effect on Saturn’s permanent winds have hitherto been unconstrained by data, because there was insufficient… 
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Observations of a giant thunderstorm at planetocentric latitude 35° north that reached a latitudinal extension of 10,000 kilometres about three weeks after it started in early December 2010, which developed an elongated eastward tail with additional but weaker storm cells that wrapped around the whole planet by February 2011.
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