Deep brain stimulation for pain relief: A meta-analysis

@article{Bittar2005DeepBS,
  title={Deep brain stimulation for pain relief: A meta-analysis},
  author={R. Bittar and I. Kar-Purkayastha and S. Owen and Renee E. Bear and A. Green and Shouyan Wang and T. Aziz},
  journal={Journal of Clinical Neuroscience},
  year={2005},
  volume={12},
  pages={515-519}
}
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used to treat intractable pain for over 50 years. Variations in targets and surgical technique complicate the interpretation of many studies. To better understand its efficacy, we performed a meta-analysis of DBS for pain relief. MEDLINE (1966 to February 2003) and EMBASE (1980 to January 2003) databases were searched using key words deep brain stimulation, sensory thalamus, periventricular gray and pain. Inclusion criteria were based on patient… Expand
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