Decreasing Psychiatric Symptoms by Increasing Choice in Services for Adults with Histories of Homelessness

@article{Greenwood2005DecreasingPS,
  title={Decreasing Psychiatric Symptoms by Increasing Choice in Services for Adults with Histories of Homelessness},
  author={Ronni Michelle Greenwood and Nicole J. Schaefer-McDaniel and Gary H. Winkel and Sam J. Tsemberis},
  journal={American Journal of Community Psychology},
  year={2005},
  volume={36},
  pages={223-238}
}
Despite the increase in consumer-driven interventions for homeless and mentally ill individuals, there is little evidence that these programs enhance psychological outcomes. This study followed 197 homeless and mentally ill adults who were randomized into one of two conditions: a consumer-driven “Housing First” program or “treatment as usual” requiring psychiatric treatment and sobriety before housing. Proportion of time homeless, perceived choice, mastery, and psychiatric symptoms were… 

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