Deconstructing the relationship between genetics and race

@article{Bamshad2004DeconstructingTR,
  title={Deconstructing the relationship between genetics and race},
  author={Michael J. Bamshad and Stephen Wooding and Benjamin A. Salisbury and J. Claiborne Stephens},
  journal={Nature Reviews Genetics},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={598-609}
}
The success of many strategies for finding genetic variants that underlie complex traits depends on how genetic variation is distributed among human populations. This realization has intensified the investigation of genetic differences among groups, which are often defined by commonly used racial labels. Some scientists argue that race is an adequate proxy of ancestry, whereas others claim that race belies how genetic variation is apportioned. Resolving this controversy depends on understanding… Expand
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