Deconstructing cartilage shape and size into contributions from embryogenesis, metamorphosis, and tadpole and frog growth

@article{Rose2015DeconstructingCS,
  title={Deconstructing cartilage shape and size into contributions from embryogenesis, metamorphosis, and tadpole and frog growth},
  author={Christopher S Rose and Danny Murawinski and Virginia K. Horne},
  journal={Journal of Anatomy},
  year={2015},
  volume={226}
}
  • Christopher S Rose, Danny Murawinski, Virginia K. Horne
  • Published 2015
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Journal of Anatomy
  • Understanding skeletal diversification involves knowing not only how skeletal rudiments are shaped embryonically, but also how skeletal shape changes throughout life. The pharyngeal arch (PA) skeleton of metamorphosing amphibians persists largely as cartilage and undergoes two phases of development (embryogenesis and metamorphosis) and two phases of growth (larval and post‐metamorphic). Though embryogenesis and metamorphosis produce species‐specific features of PA cartilage shape, the extents… CONTINUE READING

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