Deconfounding Serial Recall

@article{Cowan2002DeconfoundingSR,
  title={Deconfounding Serial Recall},
  author={Nelson Cowan and J. Scott Saults and Emily M. Elliott and Matthew V. Moreno},
  journal={Journal of Memory and Language},
  year={2002},
  volume={46},
  pages={153-177}
}
  • Nelson Cowan, J. Scott Saults, +1 author Matthew V. Moreno
  • Published 2002
  • Psychology
  • Journal of Memory and Language
  • Immediate recall of nine-digit lists was examined with a method designed to disentangle three factors: input serial position, output position, and response set size (the number of items yet to be recalled). Recall began at Input Serial Position 1, 4, or 7 and included either three consecutive items (in partial recall) or all items from the cued point to the end of the list and then continuing from the beginning in a circular fashion (in whole recall). Lists were spoken or printed and were… CONTINUE READING

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