Decomposition and colonization by micro-arthropods of two litter types in a tropical montane rain forest in southern Ecuador

@article{Illig2008DecompositionAC,
  title={Decomposition and colonization by micro-arthropods of two litter types in a tropical montane rain forest in southern Ecuador},
  author={J. Illig and H. Schatz and S. Scheu and M. Maraun},
  journal={Journal of Tropical Ecology},
  year={2008},
  volume={24},
  pages={157 - 167}
}
Abstract: The decomposition of litter of two tree species Graffenrieda emarginata (Melastomataceae), Purdiaea nutans (Cyrillaceae) and the mixture of both was investigated in a tropical montane rain forest in southern Ecuador at two different altitudes (1850 and 2280 m). The two litter types differed strongly in nitrogen concentration, suggesting that G. emarginata (1.21% N) decomposes faster than P. nutans (0.73% N). To study the effect of soil micro-arthropods on the decomposition process… Expand
Roots, mycorrhizal fungi and altitude as determinants of litter decomposition and soil animal communities in tropical montane rainforests
TLDR
The results indicate that in nutrient limited tropical montane rainforests mycorrhizal fungi suppress the activity of other microorganisms, potentially competing for litter-derived resources, at each of the investigated altitudes. Expand
Altitude and decomposition stage rather than litter origin structure soil microarthropod communities in tropical montane rainforests
TLDR
The results suggest that the origin and therefore quality of litter material is of little importance as driving factor for the composition of microarthropod communities of tropical montane rainforests, and factors changing between rainforest sites at different altitude, as well as decomposition stage of litter and associated changes in the microbial community are much more important. Expand
Leaf Litterfall and Decomposition of Polylepis reticulata in the Treeline of the Ecuadorian Andes
Leaf litterfall contributes significantly to carbon fluxes in forests. A crucial open question for the sustainability of mountain forests is how climate change will affect this and other carbonExpand
Leaf Litter Chemistry Drives the Structure and Composition of Soil Testate Amoeba Communities in a Tropical Montane Rainforest of the Ecuadorian Andes
TLDR
The data show that leaf litter chemistry overrides leaf litter richness in structuring testate amoeba communities, and high litter nitrogen and low lignin concentrations are indicators of high litter quality for testateAmoebae density and species richness. Expand
Leaf and root litter decomposition is discontinued at high altitude tropical montane rainforests contributing to carbon sequestration
TLDR
The results show that, irrespective of litter origin and type, unfavorable microenvironmental conditions at high altitudes inhibit decomposition processes resulting in the sequestration of carbon in thick organic layers. Expand
Litter Decomposition of Two Pioneer Tree Species and Associated Soil Fauna in Areas Reclaimed after Surface Coal Mining in Southern Brazil
Decomposition of leaf litter from pioneer tree species and development of associated soil meso- and macrofauna are fundamental for rehabilitation processes in reclaimed coal mining areas. The aim ofExpand
Leaf litter identity rather than diversity shapes microbial functions and microarthropod abundance in tropical montane rainforests
TLDR
Results provide evidence that decomposition and microbial biomass in litter respond to leaf litter diversity as well as litter identity (chemical and physical characteristics), while microarthropods respond only to litter identity but not litter diversity. Expand
How does litter quality affect the community of soil protists (testate amoebae) of tropical montane rainforests?
TLDR
The results suggest that local factors, such as litter quality, function as major forces shaping the structure and density of decomposer microfauna that likely feed back to decomposition processes. Expand
Litter mixture effects on decomposition in tropical montane rainforests vary strongly with time and turn negative at later stages of decay
TLDR
Plant species diversity appears to act as a major driver for decomposition processes in tropical montane rainforest ecosystems, highlighting the need for increasing plant conservation efforts to protect ecosystem functioning of this threatened biodiversity hotspot. Expand
The effect of microarthropods on litter decomposition depends on litter quality
TLDR
Mesofauna may enhance litter decomposition stronger in recalcitrant litter than in high-quality litter, and litter with foreign mesofauna would decompose slower than with native one. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 59 REFERENCES
Soil microarthropod contributions to decomposition dynamics : Tropical-temperate comparisons of a single substrate
TLDR
There was a positive relationship between species richness and the contribution of the fauna to litter mass loss within each site, and species diversity of decomposer fauna may have important ecosystem consequences, particularly in warm moist tropical forests. Expand
Separating the effects of forest type and elevation on the diversity of litter invertebrate communities in a humid tropical forest in Puerto Rico
TLDR
The differences observed from the lower slopes to the summits, in animal abundance, species richness and the uniformity of communities, are better explained by the contribution of forest composition to the chemical and physical nature of litter and forest heterogeneity, rather than to direct effects of temperature and rainfall differences. Expand
SOIL FAUNA AND PLANT LITTER DECOMPOSITION IN TROPICAL AND SUBALPINE FORESTS
The decomposition of plant residues is influenced by their chemical com- position, the physical-chemical environment, and the decomposer organisms. Most studies interested in latitudinal gradients ofExpand
Oribatid mite (Acari: Oribatida) contribution to decomposition dynamic of leaf litter in primary forest, second growth, and polyculture in the Central Amazon.
TLDR
The oribatid mite community, which developed in the litter bags under tropical conditions, was atypical of the normal stages of leaf litter breakdown and decomposition, and there were differences in the colonization of species in relation to the mesh size of the litterbags. Expand
The Decomposition of Leaf Litter in Jamaican Montane Rain Forests
TLDR
Data for a range of tropical rain forests suggest that the rate of decay of the standing crop of leaf litter parallels the net primary productivity and stature of the forest, irrespective of altitude. Expand
ORIBATID MITE (ACARI: ORIBATIDA) CONTRIBUTION TO DECOMPOSITION DYNAMIC OF LEAF LITTER IN PRIMARY FOREST, SECOND GROWTH, AND POLYCULTURE IN THE CENTRAL AMAZON
TLDR
The oribatid mite community, which developed in the litterbags under tropical conditions, was atypical of the normal stages of leaf litter breakdown and decomposition, and differences were very closely related to the specific habits and habitat of the dominant species. Expand
The influence of plant litter diversity on decomposer abundance and diversity
TLDR
Litter mixing effects on the abundance and diversity of decomposer biota, when they occur, are likely to be of secondary and generally minor significance when compared to the effects of litter species identity and composition. Expand
Determinants of litter mixing effects in a Swedish boreal forest
TLDR
In boreal forests slow decomposing litters (particularly those of feather mosses) may contribute to enhancing moisture attention in the litter layer, which in turn promotes the decomposition and N release of associated litters. Expand
Leaf decomposition in two semi-evergreen tropical forests: influence of litter quality
Abstract. Decomposition processes in tropical semi-evergreen forests are still poorly understood. The influence of soil properties and litter quality on decomposition rate was studied in twoExpand
Decomposition in tropical forests: a pan‐tropical study of the effects of litter type, litter placement and mesofaunal exclusion across a precipitation gradient
Summary 1. Litter decomposition recycles nutrients and causes large fluxes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. It is typically assumed that climate, litter quality and decomposer communitiesExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...