Corpus ID: 131521844

Decolonizing or Recolonizing: Indigenous Peoples and the Law in Canada

@inproceedings{Toovey2005DecolonizingOR,
  title={Decolonizing or Recolonizing: Indigenous Peoples and the Law in Canada},
  author={Karilyn. Toovey},
  year={2005}
}
This thesis examines the limitations and drawbacks in using the law with respect to cases involving Indigenous rights and title. The research methodology has consisted of canvassing available writings, looking at case law, and interviews, with lawyers and individual participants in the judicial process. This thesis will demonstrate that tackling issues of rights and title through the Canadian judicial system is potentially dangerous to the advancement of Indigenous rights and title. The… Expand
1 Citations
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