Decoding the Formation of New Semantics: MVPA Investigation of Rapid Neocortical Plasticity during Associative Encoding through Fast Mapping

@article{AtirSharon2015DecodingTF,
  title={Decoding the Formation of New Semantics: MVPA Investigation of Rapid Neocortical Plasticity during Associative Encoding through Fast Mapping},
  author={Tali Atir-Sharon and Asaf Gilboa and Hananel Hazan and Ester Koilis and L. Manevitz},
  journal={Neural Plasticity},
  year={2015},
  volume={2015}
}
Neocortical structures typically only support slow acquisition of declarative memory; however, learning through fast mapping may facilitate rapid learning-induced cortical plasticity and hippocampal-independent integration of novel associations into existing semantic networks. During fast mapping the meaning of new words and concepts is inferred, and durable novel associations are incidentally formed, a process thought to support early childhood's exuberant learning. The anterior temporal lobe… 

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