Decoding Hindlimb Movement for a Brain Machine Interface after a Complete Spinal Transection

@inproceedings{Manohar2012DecodingHM,
  title={Decoding Hindlimb Movement for a Brain Machine Interface after a Complete Spinal Transection},
  author={Anitha Manohar and Robert D. Flint and Eric B. Knudsen and Karen Anne Moxon},
  booktitle={PloS one},
  year={2012}
}
Stereotypical locomotor movements can be made without input from the brain after a complete spinal transection. However, the restoration of functional gait requires descending modulation of spinal circuits to independently control the movement of each limb. To evaluate whether a brain-machine interface (BMI) could be used to regain conscious control over the hindlimb, rats were trained to press a pedal and the encoding of hindlimb movement was assessed using a BMI paradigm. Off-line… CONTINUE READING
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